Posts Tagged: Urban exploration

Grumant

Drone shot III over Grumant

Drone shot III over Grumant / Svalbard

I continue my series about abandoned places here at Svalbard. This time there is also an abandoned Soviet mining town I want to present. Previous post about Coles Bay is closely related to Grumant. And I encourage you to read it first. Urban/Rural exploration is a nice hobby that combines photography and my fascination with abandoned human activity. I urge people to experience these places but to explore carefully and not damage anything.

How to get there

Map Grumant Longyearbyen

Map Grumant Longyearbyen Svalbard

There are no fences around Grumant or other obstacles that keeps you out of Grumant, however the settlement is quite inaccessible. The safest route is probably by boat in the summer time. It is less than 20km one way and should not take long. There is not a particularly good harbor in the area around Grumant, and I recommend that you enter at calm sea. The other routes on foot in summer time and by snowmobile in winter is both dangerous and difficult for most people. I would not describe them here considering what situation people might put themselves in. No liner or regular tours go there. It is best if visitors acquire a local tour guide who is willing to show you Grumant.

What is it

Blue room at Grumant

Blue room at Grumant / Svalbard

As described in my previous article about Coles Bay, Grumant and Coles Bay was connected by railway. Grumant had a poor harbor and Coles Bay suited much better for shipment of coal and other transport that went by sea. Grumant is a small town between high mountains near the Icefjord, and at the most there were 1,100 residents in the 50s. Grumant had the coal-mine entrances and other buildings with related industrial workplaces. In addition the workers had their living quarters in that narrow valley. I am lucky to have lived in a time that we still could visit the houses and see the beautiful wall paintings and ceiling decorations. It is clear that they had a canteen there and a building for either an infirmary or a kindergarten. Maybe both!

 

Condition

Wall paintings III

Wall paintings III. In Grumant / Svalbard

There are not many buildings left in Grumant and those still standing are in a miserable condition. It is especially the severe weather conditions that is the problem. Roofs have collapsed, erosion from the seaside has came dangerously close to the buildings and the permafrost is constantly moving the ground under the houses. Slowly, but surely this destroys the concrete structures in Grumant. Considering the condition I would discourage people to enter in the buildings that still stand.

“Take nothing but pictures. Leave nothing but footprints” Is a good rule to follow. These places exist because there was activity in the area and the facilities and location served people a purpose. Today they are a memory of a bygone era. Let us not destroy them or affect them in any way with today’s activity.

A few shots from Grumant

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Coles Bay

Coles Bay seen from drone I

Coles Bay Svalbard. Drone shot

Urban/rural exploration has been a hobby that has given me much joy over the years. Both the historical aspect of it and the joy of taking pictures and documenting old ruins. Svalbard has many such places, and I thought it was a good idea to introduce them here. Maybe others will have an interest in visiting these places as well? Coles Bay is one of the abandoned settlement that is easiest to visit, and I thought to introduce it first.

Detail at Coles Bay Svalbard

CCCP detail found at Coles Bay Svalbard. The russian abbreviation for USSR.

What is it: Coles Bay area has a history of Norwegian trappers dating back to 19th century, but the buildings and ruins we see today stems from the Soviet mining operations that came later in the 20. century. Coles Bay and Grumant further north was linked by railways. Coles Bay had a good harbor and functioned as an export port for the Grumant settlement. Grumant and Coles Bay had a total of over 1,100 inhabitants at its peak in 1951-1952.

Port of Coles Bay

Shipwreck at port of Coles Bay Svalbard

What to explore: In the area there are about 10 to 12 large and small buildings that are more or less intact. Several ruins can also be seen in the area. There are two ports in Coles Bay and at one of them lies a shipwreck half sunk. Traces of the old railway is seen north-west of town going toward Grumant. The old power plant and the graveyard is seen in easterly direction from the main buildings.

Remains of Coles Bay

Remains of Coles Bay Svalbard. These structures are lost in the bay, and not visible anymore.

Condition: Most buildings have roofs intact but may have such a state that those are not recommended to enter. Some houses have locked doors and windows in good condition, while the other houses are open. Intrusion by force to closed buildings is not ok.

Map Longyearbyen - Coles Bay

Map showing route between Longyearbyen and Coles Bay.

How to get there: You can travel to Coles Bay with either boat in the summer time or snowmobile in the winter time. Coles Bay has a good harbour and is a safe lie in. The trip from Longyearbyen by boat is approximately 25 kilometers one way. No liner go there ohwever regular tours go there in winter time. In winter you can travel with snowmobile over the mountains near Longyearbyen and down Colesdalen. Also about 25 km one way. It is recommended to travel with a local guide to get to Coles Bay. Hiking between Longyearbyen and Coles Bay is not recommended. At least not for people without mountain experience.

“Take nothing but pictures. Leave nothing but footprints” Is a good rule to follow. These places exist because there was activity in the area and the facilities and location served people a purpose. Today they are a memory of a bygone era. Let us not destroy them or affect them in any way with today’s activity. Be careful.